What determines the effect that a certain environment has on us?
What makes us feel at ease in some areas or make us more productive in the workplace?

The answer, in both cases, is in the color temperature of light.

Color temperature describes the color of light and is measured in Kelvin (K).
Depending on the temperature of the light used, while we stand in front of a same scenario, our eye will perceive it in a different way, with all the psychological and sensory consequences that this has.

Warm light


The warm light, with color temperature below 3500 K, has a shade that starting from a warm white is moving closer to red, passing through various shades of yellow and orange as the color temperature lowers, a bit as it happens to the sky at sunset,as the sun descends behind the horizon.

The warm light is perceived as soft and welcoming. The first sensation it reminds is that of a cozy fireplace (1000-2000 K), sublime example of comfort, for this reason is often used in homes, in some restaurants and lounge bars, spas or other places devoted to relax.

Temperatures from 2650 K to 2980 K are typical of incandescent lightbulbs with power from 40W to 200W, now out of production.

White light


Between 3000 K and 4100 K, we find the white lights, from warm white up to cool white, passing through neutral white.

Usually most of the light sources used at home are in this range, which allows to have adequate lighting to perform tasks requiring a certain concentration, highlights the forms but doesn’t accentuate the shadows too sharply.

A warm white is usually preferred in bedrooms and living rooms, while a cool white is usually used for bathrooms and kitchens.

Cool light


Above 3500 K we find what is called cool light, with shades starting from pure white up to the sky blue, passing through all the shades in between. Despite being perceived as hard and sharp indoor, cool light is the one that comes closest to the day light, that from dawn to midday peak ranges from 2800 K to 5500 K.

The cool light transmits sensations of order, cleanliness and efficiency: this is why it’s used in many public places such as supermarkets, schools, clinics and waiting rooms.

At home, cool light is usually not recommended, although in particular situations can help, such as in the case you have your own home office. However, it’s always recommended to use it with moderation, remember that our body and brain need a period of time to regain an adequate state of relaxation after being exposed to cool lights.

With 3000 Kelvin, it radiates a slightly warm white light, allowing you to focus while fitting the need of a moment of relaxation, making the atmosphere welcoming and encouraging creativity.
Thanks to this feature, with HOKU you can enjoy the right light for as long as you want, and still be ready to relax as soon as you feel the need, just by tapping its touch control to put its light to rest.

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